Hate Nation

Although we take pride in being a developed nation, we still have a long way to go towards reducing organized hatred, hostility and violence against people who differ from “us” in race, color, ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, sexual orientation or are designated as marginal within our society.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center’s 2015 Intelligence Report, the number of hate groups active in the U.S rose from 784 in 2014 to 892 in 2015. The U.S. is home to the world’s most notorious hate group, the Ku Klux Klan, which had the largest share of U.S. hate groups that year (21.3 %). It was followed by the Black Separatists (20.2%), the Racist Skinheads (10.7%), the White Nationalists (10.7%) and the Neo-Nazis (10.5%). These 5 groups comprise 73% of the known hate groups in the U.S. Among the states, Texas reported the largest number, 84, 55 of which were KKK. California came second with 68 groups, mainly Black Separatists and Racist Skinheads. Florida ranked third, with 59, 22 of which were Black Separatist groups.

The following infographic shows the extent and distribution of known hate groups in the U.S.

Click through to see the enlarged image.

HateGroups_Infograph

Techniques Used
The above visualization includes 3 types of techniques:

Quantitative Analysis: A bar chart was used to visualize quantitative data on the number of known hate groups.

Statistical Analysis (GIS): Spatial analysis included 3 major techniques. The geocoding technique converted hate group locations to a point on the map, choropleth maps and classification methods were used to show the distribution of hate groups by state and to identify the correlation among race and the density of hate groups in each state.

Graphics: Graphics and images used in the infographics were edited using Photoshop graphic design software.

Implementing visualization techniques in faculty research
The image of the map reflects the different visualization techniques that might be used to effectively convey data or research conclusions to different types of audiences in various disciplines or industries. Visualizations can help identify existing or emerging trends, spot irregularities or obscure patterns, and even address or solve issues.

Ask us how to visualize your research
For help visualizing your own research findings or seeing if your research lends itself to similar techniques including data acquisition and pre-processing of both quantitative and qualitative data, contact Nandhini Gulasingam at mgulasin@depaul.edu.

State of Minimum Wage$ in the U.S.

Since the U.S. instituted a federal minimum wage rate in 1938, various state and local governments have pushed for higher rates. Seattle was the first to increase its minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2017, a $2 increase every year starting from 2015. San Francisco followed suit with an increase to $15 by 2018. In 2015, Oakland increased its rate to $12.25, and Chicago will slowly increase its minimum wage from $8.25 to $13 an hour by 2019. The rate in Washington, D.C. is currently $10.50 and will be increased to $11.50 by the end of 2016. The federal minimum wage has been $7.25 an hour since 2009.

According to a U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 report, in 2014 (the latest year detailed data is available), 3.8% of all hourly workers 16 years and older (roughly 3 million workers) were paid at or below the federal minimum wage, with 1.6% at the federal level and 2.2% below. Women were 2.9% of the total and men 1.6%. A regional breakdown showed that 2.6%-2.8% of Southern workers fell below the federal minimum with Louisiana reporting the highest percentage of workers (3.5%) making less than the minimum.

The following infographic shows the state of the minimum wage throughout the U.S.

Click through to see the enlarged image.

MinumumWage

Techniques Used
The above visualization includes 3 types of techniques:

Quantitative Analysis: Two chart types were used to visualize quantitative data on wages: a trend chart shows the historic U.S. minimum wages adjusted for inflation using 2015 CPI (consumer price index) and a bubble chart shows countries with hourly minimum wages higher than that of the U.S.

Statistical Analysis (GIS): The spatial analysis shows statistical analysis ranges from basic counts such as total characters and words, number of lines and syllables, and average words per line or sentence to more complex indices and densities.

Graphics: Graphics and images used in the infographics were edited using Photoshop graphic design software.

Implementing visualization techniques in faculty research
The image above shows different visualization techniques that might be used to effectively convey data or research conclusions to different types of audiences in various disciplines or industries. Some visualizations can help identify existing or emerging trends, spot irregularities or obscure patterns, and even address or solve issues.

Ask us how to visualize your research
If you want help visualizing your own research findings or wonder if your research lends itself to similar techniques including data acquisition and preprocessing of both quantitative and qualitative data, contact Nandhini Gulasingam at mgulasin@depaul.edu.

How Sarah Read Works

sarah_read2

Location:  DePaul University (or Starbucks, where I am right now?)
Current Gig:  Assistant Professor, Writing, Rhetoric & Discourse
One word that best describes how you work:  Interval training
Current mobile device: Iphone 4S
Current computer: MacBook Air

What apps/software/tools can’t you live without? My At-A-Glance paper planner (without it I am a useless woman) and Dropbox, which means I can move seamlessly between work and home and the coffeeshop.

What’s your workspace setup like: Minimalist and open. I use a fully adjustable computer desk. I’m a short, small person, so conventional desks are just too big.

What’s your best time-saving shortcut/life hack? Do you automate something that used to be a time sink? Do you relegate email to an hour a day? Back when I ran track and cross-country in high school and college my greatest strength was pacing. I wasn’t the fasted member of the team, but I always ran my intervals during practice at a consistent rate; i.e., I didn’t tire myself out on the first few and then die through the last ones. This is my approach to research projects and writing. Small chunks. Over time at the same rate. The down side of this strategy, however, is that I don’t accelerate very well. In a nutshell, I don’t do all-nighters.

What’s your favorite to-do list manager? Good ol’ fashioned At-A-Glance monthly paper planner. I am very visual person and I like to see my whole month at once. I also find it that takes less time/thought/energy to enter a few cryptic notes with a few scribbles of my pen.

Besides your phone and computer, what gadget can’t you live without and why? Do I need to mention the almighty At-A-Glance planner again? Seriously, without it I am a woman without a plan or a life.

What everyday thing are you better at than everyone else? What’s your secret?Tracking the family to-do list and the contents of the fridge (which I can recite from memory at any given time). It drives my husband crazy. My secret? Well, my theory is that girls are trained to pay attention to things like the contents of the fridge (to plan the shopping list), the location of items (clutter clean-up) in the house, and the chores that need to be done (no one else will do them) by just observing what their mothers’ paid attention to as they grew up. My parents had a traditional division of labor at home, and this is how it imprinted on me, whether I like it or not.

What do you listen to while you work? Mostly the chatter of my own mind. However, if I am grading or doing administrative tasks I listen to WFUV FM (public radio from Fordham University in New York City—new alternative/folk/rock music) via the web.

What do you do to stay inspired? Who are some of your favorite artists?  Right now I am educating myself about contemporary dance choreography by attending all of the amazing contemporary dance company performances in Chicago. I am a particular fan of Hubbard Street Dance Company, a truly world-class dance company born right here in Chicago—their creative and interesting choreography and world class technique blow me away. As a language person, I am enjoying learning about the language of dance and how to join the conversation about it.

What sort of work are you up to now? Right now I am finishing up ethnographic field work about technical documentation and reporting processes at a supercomputing research facility int the Chicago area. I am starting to work on my book project, Writing Infrastructure.

What are you currently reading? Pride and Prejudice (By Jane Austen), the graphic novel (not by Jane Austen)

Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert? Maybe both?  Total introvert, although I have to come out of my cave sometimes in order to maintain my sanity. Teaching is good for that.

What’s your sleep routine like? Totally regular. Sleep by 11pm. Up at 6:45.

Fill in the blank: I’d love to see__________ answer these same questions. Woodstock.  

Why? Sorry, I only have goofy answers to this question.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? Wow—this is the toughest question. I couldn’t tell you the source of this advice, but for me an essential insight has been to have the courage to believe that my ideas, my writing, my work has value and to put it out there in the conversation. It is an act of courage to declare oneself a writer (an academic writer, creative writer, etc.) and to just start doing it. I feel like I have to be courageous in this way almost every day. Writers, of all kinds, are incredibly courageous people.

Is there anything else you’d like to add that might be interesting to readers and fans? Thanks for asking these questions. And thanks for reading.


The How I Work series featured on the re/search blog is shamelessly stolen from Life Hacker’s How I Work series.  The SSRC’s version asks DePaul’s heroes, experts, and individuals of note to share their shortcuts, workspaces, routines, and more. Have someone you want to see featured, or questions you think we should ask? Email Jessi Bishop-Royse at jbishopr AT depaul.edu.

Visualizing ‘The Star’

While Mozart is popularly believed to have originated the lullaby, “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” the words to the famous cradle song were written by Jane Taylor, an English poet and novelist. It was first published in 1806 in “Rhymes for the Nursery,” written and complied by Jane and her sister Ann Taylor. Like other lullabies, it came to be paired with the melody of a popular French children’s song, “Ah! vous dirais-je, Maman,” a tune popularized further by Mozart’s twelve different tune variations.
The infograph below creates a contemporary visualization of this classic lullaby.

Click through to see the enlarged image.

TwinkleTwinkle_TextAnalysis

Techniques Used
The above visualization includes 3 types of analysis techniques:

Text Analysis: The word trend graph shows the relative frequencies of the words used most. The word cloud displays all the words of the lullaby in the form of a cloud with the size of the text proportional to the word frequency. The text network shows the most influential words in the lullaby responsible for the theme shifts and other themes associated with these influential words using a non-linear network diagram.

Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis ranges from basic counts such as total characters and words, number of lines and syllables, and average words per line or sentence to more complex indices and densities.

Quantitative Analysis: Two chart types were used to visualize quantitative data — a trend chart showing word counts of the most frequently used words and a bubble chart showing the word count of all words in the lullaby.

Implementing visualization techniques in faculty research
The image above shows different visualization techniques used in analyzing text such as books, articles or even candidate stump speeches. These might be used to effectively convey data or research conclusions to different types of audiences in various disciplines or industries.

Ask us how to visualize your research
If you want help visualizing your own research findings or wonder if your research lends itself to similar techniques including data acquisition and preprocessing of both quantitative and qualitative data, contact Nandhini Gulasingam at mgulasin@depaul.edu.

Putting Art History on the Map

Joanna Gardner-Huggett, associate professor and chair of the Department of the History of Art and Architecture (HAA), has taken the plunge into the digital environment, setting her compass on mapping and spatial analysis to guide her current art historical research.

ARCHer subject is two Chicago feminist arts collectives that began in 1973: Artemisia, which lasted until 2003, and the still-operating ARC.  Her goal is to
tell the collective history of the two galleries by measuring their impact on the careers of the individual artists they touched as well as on the practice of art in and beyond Chicago at a significant point in the history of feminism and of separatist organizations.

Using ArcGIS data visualization software, she has been creating geographical maps based on the social, educational and professional demographics of the 129 member and guest artists who had solo shows at the two galleries from 1980–1985, “just to see if there were any patterns,” Joanna said.

What she’s discovered is that it’s “really a local story.  The mapping helped distill that beautifully,” she added.  To her surprise, she found that it “mostly had little to do w/ feminism,” she added.  “That was eye-opening, but really useful.”  She considers the role of the two collectives as essential in the development of a whole new generation of women artists.  “That’s the challenge,” Joanna said.  “There are so many people.  How do you write about a big group?”

The ARC and Artemisia archives held at the Ryerson and Burnham Libraries are her primary research source.  Through mapping and an analysis of spatial evidence she hopes to discover when the two groups were at their highest and lowest points of influence and what intersections were occurring at those points in time.

“I think art historians can make broad generalizations when discussing archival data, and the mapping makes us more accountable for our conclusions,” she explained.  “For me, the mapping is just a really wonderful tool.”

Joanna credits her HAA colleague Professor Paul Jaskot for igniting her digital exploration.  At his suggestion, she applied for and was selected as one of 15 Fellows to take part in the first-ever Summer Institute on Digital Mapping and Art History held in August 2014 at Middlebury College.  Paul and Middlebury Associate Professor of Geography Anne Kelley Knowles organized and co-direct the annual, hands-on, two-week symposium funded by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.  Joanna thanks DPU Department of Geography Chair Euan Hague for referring her to the SSRC where Nandhini Gulasingam is guiding her use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and data visualization tools and techniques.  Joanna in turn has referred fellow HAA Associate Professor Delia Cosentino to the SSRC for help creating maps locating metal replicas of Mayan calendar stones for a project in Pilsen.

“It’s so great having that as a resource,” Joanna said of the SSRC.  “A lot of my colleagues don’t have that kind of support at other institutions.”  The students in Nandhini’s WQ Community GIS II class in the Department of Geography will incorporate Joanna’s database into their community-based group projects.  Joanna’s next steps will be to increase her own GIS proficiency and to develop more narrative-driven maps, possibly using Tableau or other visual analytics applications, with the help of the SSRC.

Some of Joanna’s maps may become available to future researchers on a website database that former members of Artemisia are building.  She’s also grateful to the Women and Leadership Archives at Loyola University Chicago which is collecting and preserving the papers of ARC and Artemisia members.

Crime in Chicago

Among the 11,363 crimes reported in Chicago during the first 9 months of 2015, theft, battery, criminal damage, narcotics and assault ranked highest, totaling 68% of all reported crime. The infographic below shows a snapshot of crime in Chicago during this period.

Click through to see the enlarged image.
ChicagoCrime_Final

Techniques Used
The above visualization includes 4 main types of visualization techniques:

Text Analysis: The first image is a visual a representation of text data, specifically the word count of the type of crimes (i.e. frequency) displayed as a word cloud.

Spatial Analysis (GIS): The map uses an Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method to identify crime hotspots (in red). It also allows one to predict the frequency of crime at an unknown location based on the known values.

Quantitative Analysis: Two chart types were used to visualize quantitative data – a bar chart showing the crime counts of the major crime types for the most affected ward/community, and a bubble chart showing the number of crime by ward and community.

Implementing visualization techniques in faculty research
The image above shows different visualization techniques that might be used to effectively convey data or research conclusions to different types of audiences in various disciplines or industries.  Visualizations can help identify existing or emerging trends, spot irregularities or obscure patterns, and even address or solve issues.

A good example of one such implementation is John Conroy’s Legal Clinic project in the College of Law. This research project used a multi-pronged approach in which first, various visualizations were created to compare exonerations and false convictions in major U.S. cities. Later, the SSRC trained Conroy’s research assistants how to create an exoneration database and clean and convert data into mappable formats using various techniques.

Ask us how to visualize your research
If you want help visualizing your own research findings or wonder if your research lends itself to similar techniques including data acquisition and preprocessing of both quantitative and qualitative data, contact Nandhini Gulasingam at mgulasin@depaul.edu.

Documentary Viewing of the Film: “Everywhere But Safe: Public Injecting in New York”

The DePaul Social Science Research Center will be hosting a screening of Everywhere But Safe: Public Injecting in New York on Friday September 18th, from 7:00-8:30 pm in SAC254.  The film is a documentary, produced by Sawbuck Productions, Inc examining public injection drug use in New York.  The documentary makes the case why supervised injections can contribute to healthier, safer communities.

Join us for the viewing!  The filmmakers, Matt Curtis of VOCAL-NY and Taeko Frost of Washington Heights Corner Project will attend the screen and host a Q&A afterwards.