Are Chicago’s Safe Passage Routes Located in the Highest Risk Areas?

Safe passage routes to school provide not only a sense of safety for Chicago students from pre-K through high school, but they reduce crime involving students and help increase school attendance. Chicago’s Safe Passage program was introduced in 2009 after the beating death by gangs of 16-year-old Fenger High School honors student Derrion Albert, which was captured on cell phone video. His death and the circumstances received national attention along with a series of other incidents involving CPS students caught in gang violence. Since then, the program has expanded to include schools, parents, residents, law enforcement officials and even local businesses in efforts to provide students with a safe environment. The various types of safe passage programs among the 51 safe route programs currently available include: safe haven programs in which students who fear for their safety can find refuge at the local police station, fire house, library and even convenience stores, barbershops and restaurants; patrols along school routes by veterans, parents and local residents; and walking to school programs in which parents and local residents create a presence to help deter unlawful incidents.

The map below shows the number of all crimes committed in the city of Chicago during the current school year, and the locations of schools and safe routes among those communities that have safe routes. Currently, there are 517 Chicago public schools, of which, only 136 Chicago public schools (26.3% of all schools) fall within the 51 safe routes. Although the safe routes are located in 37 of the high crime communities in general (south, west and northeast sides of Chicago), they do not exist in the pockets of the highest crime incidents (1,500+ highlighted in burgundy) where children are the most vulnerable. Of the 47 schools that fall within the extreme crime areas (1,500+ incidents a year), only 6 have safe routes; the others offer no safe passage options. A list of the schools appears at the end of this blog.

Click through to see the enlarged image.


SafePassage_Routs

Schools located in extremely high-crime areas of Chicago (Schools highlighted in green have safe passage routes):
Bennett, Bowen HS, Bradwell, Camelot Safe – Garfield Park, Camelot Safe Academy, Clark HS, Coles, Community, Ericson, Frazier Charter, Frazier Prospective, Galapagos Charter, Great Lakes Charter, Gregory, Harlan HS, Hefferan, Heroes, Herzl, Hirsch HS, Hubbard HS, Learn Charter – Butler, Leland, Mann, Mireles, Noble Charter – Academy, Noble Charter – Baker College Prep, Noble Charter – DRW, Noble Charter – Muchin, Noble Charter – Rowe Clark, Oglesby, Plato, Polaris Charter, Powell, Schmid, Shabazz Charter – Shabazz, Smith, South Shore Intl HS, Webster, Westcott, Winnie Mandela HS, YCCS Charter – Association House, YCCS Charter – CCA Academy, YCCS Charter – Community Service, YCCS Charter – Innovations, YCCS Charter – Olive Harvey, YCCS Charter – Sullivan, YCCS Charter – Youth Development

 

Implementing visualization techniques in faculty research
The image of the map reflects the different visualization techniques that might be used to effectively convey data or research conclusions to different types of audiences in various disciplines or industries. Visualizations can help identify existing or emerging trends, spot irregularities or obscure patterns, and even address or solve issues.

Ask us how to visualize your research
For help visualizing your own research findings or seeing if your research lends itself to similar techniques including data acquisition and pre-processing of both quantitative and qualitative data, contact Nandhini Gulasingam at mgulasin@depaul.edu.

Mess Hall: Collaboration at DePaul

How well does DePaul support cross-disciplinary collaboration? While intra-college projects do happen, a model for accommodating partnerships across colleges seems more pipe dream than reality. Moving innovative collaborative projects from the individual “hero-driven” approach to a process supported and valued by the institution was the topic of the May 19 Mess Hall session by Robin Burke of the College of Computing and Digital Media. Within the frame of innovation and supporting collaboration, Robin also discussed CIRSCI, the Collaboratory for Interdisciplinary Research, Scholarship and Curricular Innovation that he and SSRC Director Greg Scott have proposed to DPU administration.

“If you want to work together, you’ve got to be together,” Robin declared. A good starting point, Robin suggested, might be locating informal meeting spaces and federating existing institutes or resources that could facilitate fledgling partnerships. We recorded Robin’s brief presentation, which you can watch here. You can access related documents the links below.

Slides: A Collaboratory to Support Interdisciplinary Projects

CIRSCI Proposal

Faculty Council Resolution: Support for Collaboration

Discussion following the presentation focused on communication and documentation of both new and existing projects. Where can potential collaborators find each other or meet to hatch ideas—temporary pop-up locations and events, perhaps? What examples are underway at DePaul and where can we learn about them—maybe document them through a website? What constitutes an acceptable collaborative end product and how do you demonstrate value?

Let’s continue the discussion and talk about collaboration. What do we need? How do we get there?

Mess Hall: November 8

Writing (Precarious) Lives: Victimhood and its Affirmations in Northern Uganda

Matthew Sebastian
MA Candidate, International Studies
Friday, November 8, 2 – 3 p.m.
990 Fullerton Ave, Suite 3100

Pabbo Memorial IDP Camp and Information Centre
Pabbo Memorial IDP Camp and Information Centre, photo courtesy Matthew Sebastian

Based on fieldwork conducted over the past four years with NGO, state, and community practitioners in northern Uganda, this project examines how the experiences of individuals living amidst violent conflict are narrated, documented, archived, and curated into public sites of memory with the expectation that more peaceful futures will result.

Sebastian invites a conversation about how life histories fit into peace-building schemas and reflection on the implications for ethnographic production and the limits of ethnographic representation when writing about deeply contentious, even violent, histories.

The Kitgum/National Memory Peace and Documentation Centre (K/NMPDC)
The Kitgum/National Memory Peace and Documentation Centre (K/NMPDC), photo courtesy of Matthew Sebastian

Mess Hall is a “brown bag” series (bring your lunch!) that lets DePaul researchers present their works in progress at any stage (mess & all). Mess Hall is a safe, fun, supportive and no-pressure environment for presenters to practice conference presentations, talk through data analysis problems, or untangle conceptual or framework issues. For those not presenting, Mess Hall offers an opportunity to learn what scholars in other departments and fields are working on and to become part of a supportive community of research at DePaul. Faculty, staff, graduate and advanced undergraduate students are welcome to attend.

Mess Hall: October 11

Mess Hall is a “brown bag” series (bring your lunch!) that lets DePaul researchers present their works in progress at any stage (mess & all). Mess Hall is a safe, fun, supportive and no-pressure environment for presenters to practice conference presentations, talk through data analysis problems, or untangle conceptual or framework issues. For those not presenting, Mess Hall offers an opportunity to learn what scholars in other departments and fields are working on and to become part of a supportive community of research at DePaul. Faculty, staff, graduate and advanced undergraduate students are welcome to attend. Please RSVP on Facebook.

This month’s offering:
Transmedia for Students & Emotional Health
Doris C. Rusch (CDM), Anu Rana (CDM), Mona Shattell (CHS)

The Transmedia Project on Students and Emotional Well-Being brings together documentary episodes and experiential games that aim to capture people’s lived experience of personal struggles and inner conflicts. The goal is to raise awareness about emotional health, destigmatize, and build empathy.

We are in the process of developing 4 interactive sequences and webisodes dealing with ADD, OCD, bipolar and eating disorders and collecting written and verbal stories of these experiences from a wide range of individuals.

We have some questions we’d like to open for discussion:
• How can we find a good balance between creating something that is appealing and compelling for a diverse audience of young adults suffering from various afflictions, their friends and families, a generally interested public, and health care practitioners?
• How can we make something aesthetically compelling that communicates to a broad audience, yet remains true to people’s lived experiences?
• What additional applications and research potential should we consider as we design the overall website?

Mess Hall: Julie Buchanan

shoes on steps as part of a demonstration for the rights of the disabled
Image (c) Arc of South Carolina

Mess Hall is a “brown bag” series (bring your lunch!) that’s more like a research support group, intended to allow DePaul researchers to present their works in progress at any stage (mess & all). Mess Hall is a safe, fun, supportive and no-pressure environment for presenters to talk through data analysis problems, untangle conceptual or framework issues, or practice conference presentations. For those not presenting, Mess Hall offers an opportunity to learn what scholars in other departments and fields are working on and to become part of a supportive community of research at DePaul. Students are welcome to attend, and we will host one graduate student session per quarter.

WHO: Julie Buchanan, Graduate Student-School of Public Service

WHEN: Friday, August 9, 1 – 2 p.m.

WHERE: SSRC Conference Room, 990 W. Fullerton Ave., Suite 3100

Taking a stand:

How do advocates participate in the policy process?

The disability rights movement, made up of people with disabilities, their families, policymakers, professionals, and academics, has been advocating for decades for the rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to live, learn, and work in integrated, community settings where they have access to the same opportunities as their peers without disabilities.  Since the 1970s, public services have, to varying degrees, reflected a shift in ideology away from a segregated, custodial model toward community-integrated services that emphasize self-determination and inclusion.

Integrated employment programs offer people with intellectual and developmental disabilities the opportunity to obtain and maintain jobs with community-based employers where they earn competitive wages and work alongside people without disabilities.  The drastic variations in the provision of integrated employment programs from state to state prompted this exploratory study.  I’m examining disability advocacy movements and policy environments in three states with very different rates of serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in integrated employment programs:  Missouri, New Mexico, and Oklahoma.  I hope to discover what differentiates the advocacy movements in states with relatively high rates of integrated employment participation from those with lower rates.

I’m presenting an overview of my research design and findings to get feedback about theoretical frameworks to consider in interpreting and explaining my findings.  My literature review so far focuses on the policy making process and advocacy movements.  As a newcomer to the research process, I’d also welcome feedback on my methods and analysis.

Mess Hall: Doug Bruce

people eating together
Photo via the Cornell University Library on flickr

Mess Hall is a “brown bag” series (bring your lunch!) intended to allow DePaul researchers to present their works in progress at any stage (mess & all). Mess Hall is a safe, fun, supportive and no-pressure environment for presenters to practice conference presentations, talk through data analysis problems, or untangle conceptual or framework issues. For those not presenting, Mess Hall offers an opportunity to learn what scholars in other departments and fields are working on and to become part of a supportive community of research at DePaul.

Bring your lunch and your brains and support your colleagues’ scholarship.
If you’d like to present at Mess Hall, send an email to Jessica Speer.

WHO: Doug Bruce, Assistant Professor in Health Science and the Master of Public Health Program

WHEN: Friday, July 12, 1 – 2 p.m.

WHERE: SSRC Conference Room, 990 W. Fullerton Ave., Suite 3100

Utilizing Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) Methods to
Study Resilience among Marginally Housed or Homeless
Young Men who have Sex with Men

Homeless and marginally housed young men who have sex with men (YMSM) face multiple adversities in their lives and exhibit significant health disparities compared to other persons their age, including stably housed lesbian gay and bisexual youth. In order to better understand how this population responds to the adversity in their lives, Bruce and colleagues are preparing to launch a study of resilience among homeless and marginally housed YMSM using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods.

CBPR actively engages communities in the design, implementation, and analysis of research that is relevant to the lives of communities’ members, in order to develop programming that is not deficit-based but builds upon the strengths and resources present within such communities. The proposed study reflects a participatory collaboration between the Broadway Youth Center (BYC) and the Community Health Research and Evaluation Group (CHREG) at DePaul focusing on innovative methods to assess health among one of BYC’s target populations.

Particular focus in this discussion will be given to human subject considerations in actively engaging research participants in the design and implementation of CBPR as well as analysis and dissemination of findings.

Mess Hall

Civilian Conservation Corps Mess Hall
Civilian Conservation Corps Mess Hall Photo via OSU Special Collections on flickr. (Click on image for more info)

We’re excited to launch Mess Hall, a “brown bag” series intended to allow DePaul scholars to present their works in progress at any stage (mess & all).  Mess Hall is a safe, fun, supportive, no-pressure environment where you can practice conference presentations, talk through data analysis problems, untangle conceptual or framework issues, or solicit collaborators. For those not presenting, Mess Hall offers an opportunity to learn what scholars in other departments and fields are working on and to become part of a supportive community of research at DePaul.

Bring your lunch and your constructive criticism and support your colleagues’ scholarship. If you’d like to present at Mess Hall, send an email to Jessica Speer.

WHEN: Friday, May 17, 1 – 2 p.m.
WHERE: SSRC Conference Room, 990 W. Fullerton Ave., Suite 3100
WHO: John Mazzeo, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology

Social Foundations for a Community-Based Public Health Cholera Campaign in Borgne, Haiti

The rapid and widespread progression of cholera in rural Haiti can be attributed to a “perfect storm” of conditions including the widespread use of unprotected water sources, rudimentary sanitation, the lack of means to afford simple necessities, and the near absence of basic health services to treat the sick. Accessibility of essential health care and reliable sources of clean water in remote areas of rural Haiti are fundamental barriers to addressing acute public health emergencies including the ongoing cholera epidemic. This article explores the notion that positive health outcomes for hard to reach populations can be achieved through community mobilization. The peasant movement (gwoupman peyizan) in Borgne has established an extensive, capillarized social network that served as a model for the mobilization of volunteers in the fight against the cholera epidemic.  This case study from Borgne, Haiti describes the role of Alyans Sante Borgne (ASB), in coordinating community mobilization efforts against the epidemic. It suggests that the treatment of cholera and other infectious diseases requires a model of care delivery that efficiently brings resources to remote areas and recognizes the value of existing models of social organization in this process.