Summer 2020 Grants Newsletter: Humanities

Art Design Chicago 2020 Exhibition Research and Development Grants
Deadlines: May 15, 2020 (Letter of Intent), July 15, 2020 (Submission)
August 14, 2020 (Letter of Intent), November 2, 2020 (Submission)
Website: https://www.grantforward.com/grant?grant_id=396605&offset=1

To encourage expansive thinking about the initiative focus and support the development of deeply researched exhibitions accompanied by innovative engagement strategies and programming, the Terra Foundation is inviting Chicago-area cultural organizations to apply for two types of Research & Development Grants, which will be awarded in two stages:

  1. Exhibition Research & Development Grants, supporting research convenings, research travel, and/or a research fellow, will be awarded in summer 2020, fall 2020, and spring 2021 (respective letters of inquiry due on January 15, 2020; May 15, 2020; and August 14, 2020)
  1. Recipients of Exhibition Research & Development Grants will be eligible to apply for Community-Engagement Research & Development Grants, which will be awarded starting in fall 2021. Organizations interested in applying are asked to participate in a learning community with other Art Design Chicago partners, which will allow for sharing best engagement practices and exploring opportunities for collaboration. Additional details about the grant opportunity and learning community and will be available in fall 2020.

These research & development grants are intended to help recipients:

– Consult primary sources (e.g., archives and collections) and meet with other specialists to gain new perspectives on their exhibition topics;

– Explore possibilities for developing a traveling exhibition;

– Investigate and plan audience- and community-engagement strategies (e.g., approaches to gallery interpretation, programming, outreach, and partnerships) in early stages of exhibition development;

– Explore opportunities to work in partnership with other cultural organizations and/or community-based groups.

Exhibition Research & Development Grants may be used for one or more of the following:
Research Convening(s), enabling exhibition curators and education/engagement staff to meet in person with invited scholars and others with expertise to discuss research findings and plans for the exhibition and catalogue, and to consider ways to make the content relevant and accessible to a broad audience. TFAA funds may be used for travel and lodging for participants from outside of Chicago, meeting materials, meals, and modest honoraria for participants not employed by organizing/presenting institutions. (Awards up to $20,000).


Medieval Academy of America
Digital Humanities and Multimedia Studies Prize
Deadline: October 15, 2020
Link: https://www.medievalacademy.org/page/DHPrize

$1,000 Award for successful and innovative digital projects in Medieval Studies.

The Academy awards the annual Digital Humanities and Multimedia Studies Prize to one outstanding digital research project in Medieval Studies. The first Prize was awarded in 2017.

Projects submitted for the prize may take the form of:

  • digital-born research projects
  • databases
  • digital archives of texts or images
  • pedagogical projects
  • teaching or research tool

Or other original and innovative contributions in digital form to the academic study of the Middle Ages.
Eligibility:
To be eligible, digital project submitted each year must have been created and made available to users within the last five years.

For example, in 2018, projects created during or after 2013 are eligible. Projects created during or after 2015 are eligible for the 2020 DHMS Prize

Projects do not need to be complete, although they should show signs of continuing work and support.

The Principal Investigator of the project must be a member of the Medieval Academy of America.

The Digital Humanities and Multimedia Studies Prize Committee will select the award-winning project based on the Medieval Academy’s established criteria for high-quality digital medievalist projects, summarized below:

  • Quality of research and contributions to Medieval Studies
  • Goals and methodologies of project
  • Design, presentation, and accessibility of project
  • Sustainability of project and compatibility of its metadata

Application procedures:
Scholars at any stage in their professional careers are encouraged to apply. Candidates must have a graduate degree, but do not need to be employed at an academic institution.
Nominations and self-nominations are due by midnight on October 15.
Nomination dossiers must be submitted online and must include:

  • A short (500 words maximum) description of the nominated digital project with access information
  • A statement (250 words) of goals and methods of the project and its intended audience
  • A brief summary of technical specifications for the project
  • The names, academic affiliations (if any), and contact information of  project personnel/collaborators
  • A list of project sponsors, including publisher or host institution, and a list of external grants or awards for the project
  • A brief CV of the project creator/PI

Nominators may, if they wish, supply no more than two brief letters of recommendation from appropriate experts in the field/s of the nominated project. These should be sent by email to Executive Director Lisa Fagin Davis as PDFs on letterhead.


Society for the Historians of American Foreign Relations
Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship
Deadline: October 15, 2020
Link: https://shafr.org/members/fellowships-grants/myrna-f-bernath-fellowship

The Myrna Bernath Fellowship of up to $2,500 is intended to defray the costs of scholarly research by women. It is awarded biannually (in odd years) and announced at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. Applications are welcomed from women at U.S. universities as well as women abroad who wish to do research in the United States. Preference will be given to graduate students and those within five years of completion of their PhD.

Eligibility:

Scholars at any stage in their professional careers are encouraged to apply. Candidates must have a graduate degree, but do not need to be employed at an academic institution.

Application Procedures:

Self-nominations are expected. To apply, please read through the Instructions Sheet and then use the online application located below, which appears when applications are being accepted.  Questions can be sent by electronic mail to myrnabernath-committee@shafr.org The biannual deadline for applications is October 15 of even years.

Opportunities marked with an (*) require completion of a clearance form with DePaul’s Development Office.

Additional funding search tools are available on the ORS website at: https://offices.depaul.edu/ors/pre-award-services/identifying-funding/funding-search-tools/Pages/default.aspx


Opportunities marked with an (*) require completion of a clearance form with DePaul’s Development Office.

 

Summer 2020 Grants Newsletter: Social Sciences

Wenner-Gren Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowships*
Deadline: May 1, 2020
Website: http://www.wennergren.org/programs/hunt-postdoctoral-fellowships/eligibility

Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowships support the writing-up of already completed anthropological research. The fellowship is awarded to scholars in the earlier stages of their careers, when they frequently lack the time and resources to develop their research for publication.  Scholars with a Ph.D. in hand for no more than ten years (from the application deadline) are eligible to apply. A maximum of eight Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowships are awarded annually ($40,000 for 12 months of continuous, full-time writing).

The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields.

It is Foundation policy that Institutional Overhead or Institutional Support is not covered under this fellowship. Applicants can apply regardless of institutional affiliation, country of residence, or nationality.  Final decisions are made six months after the application deadline.

Eligibility:

  • Applicants must have a Ph.D. or equivalent at the time of application.
  • Applicants must have received a Ph.D. or equivalent within ten years of the application deadline.
  • Qualified scholars are eligible without regard to nationality, institutional, or departmental affiliation although preference is given to applicants who are untenured or do not yet have a permanent academic position.
  • The Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship is to support a continuous period of full-time academic writing. The research that forms the basis of the writing project is expected to be completed at the time of application. In special circumstances and with prior approval of the Foundation, recipients may use part of their stipend for a minor research component if necessary to complete their proposed publication/s. No research funds in addition to the basic stipend are available as part of the Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship.
  • The fellowship may be used to support the preparation of a book or monograph manuscript, journal articles, book chapters, or a combination of these forms of publication.
  • The Foundation cannot accept an application from a prior grantee unless all requirements of a previous grant have been completed. Please contact the Foundation for more information if this situation applies.
  • Prior recipients of Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowships are not eligible to apply for a second fellowship for a different writing project.
  • Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship applications that were unsuccessful in a prior funding cycle may be resubmitted only twice. A resubmission statement explaining how the application is different from the prior application and how the referees’ comments have been addressed must accompany resubmitted applications.
  • If a fellowship is awarded, the applicant must agree to comply with the Requirements and Conditions of the Hunt Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Wenner-Gren Foundation*
Post-PhD Research Grants
Deadline: June 1, 2020
Website: http://www.wennergren.org/programs/post-phd-research-grants

The program contributes to the Foundation’s overall mission to support basic research in anthropology and to ensure that the discipline continues to be a source of vibrant and significant work that furthers our understanding of humanity’s cultural and biological origins, development, and variation. The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields.

The maximum amount of the Post-Ph.D. Research Grant is US $20,000.
Required application materials:

  • General information about yourself and your project
  • An abstract of your proposed research. If your application is successful, this abstract will appear on the Foundation’s website. Please make sure your abstract is written in a style that is clearly understandable to a non-specialist.
  • Answers to five project description questions. Carefully prepare your responses, which should directly address the issues these questions raise.  The best applications make full use of the space provided.
  • A resubmission statement if the current application is a resubmission of a previously declined application.
  • A detailed budget
  • A bibliography relevant to your proposed project
  • A curriculum vitae for the applicant

American Sociological Association
Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline (FAD)
Deadline: June 15, 2020 and December 15, 2020
Website: https://www.asanet.org/careers/grants-and-fellowships/fund-advancement-discipline-fad

The American Sociological Association (ASA) invites submissions for the Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline (FAD) awards. Supported by the ASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF), the goal of this program is to nurture the development of scientific knowledge by funding small, groundbreaking research initiatives and other important scientific research activities such as conferences. FAD awards scholars with “seed money” for innovative research that has the potential for challenging the discipline, stimulating new lines of research, and creating new networks of scientific collaboration. The award is intended to provide opportunities for substantive and methodological breakthroughs, broaden the dissemination of scientific knowledge, and provide leverage for acquisition of additional research funds. The ASA encourages submissions from individuals who are early in their careers, at community colleges, or based at other institutions without extensive support for research, as well as collaborations with 2-year institutions.

Selection Criteria:
Proposals are reviewed for scientific merit and the importance of the proposed research project. Within this context, specific evaluation criteria include the following elements:

  • Innovativeness and promise of the research.
  • The potential of the study as a building block in the development of future research.
  • Appropriateness and significance of the research hypothesis.
  • Feasibility and adequacy of project design.
  • Plans for analysis of data.
  • Plans for dissemination of results.
  • Appropriateness of requested budget.
  • Conference proposals should include a discussion of activities that will lead to networking, new paradigms, and dissemination.

Principal investigators (PI) and co-PI(s) must have a PhD or equivalent. While ASA membership is not a criterion for applying or being selected for this award, if and when an award is received, the recipient must be a current ASA member. ASA membership involves acceptance of and adherence to the ASA Code of Ethics, which is critical to the implementation of the funded project. Awardees must also provide documentation of pertinent IRB approval for the project.

Funding

The current funding rate is about 10%. Awards shall not exceed $8,000 and payment may go directly to the PI or to the PI’s institution, as long as no institutional overhead is charged. Award money may not be used for ASA convention expenses, honoraria, or PI’s salary, which includes buying out of courses. Budgets that include purchases of laptop computers or other hardware will be carefully reviewed. The most frequent use of FAD money is to fund research assistants. Awardees must agree to the reporting requirements of the award. Notification of funding for the June 15th round will be sent in early September and checks will be disbursed mid-October. For the December 15th round, applicants will be notified of funding in mid-March and checks will be disbursed in mid-April.

School of Advanced Research
Resident Scholars Program
Deadline: November 2, 2020
Link: https://sarweb.org/scholars/resident/

Resident scholar fellowships are awarded annually by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to up to six scholars who have completed their research and who need time to prepare manuscripts or dissertations on topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from the perspective of anthropology or from related fields such as history and sociology. Scholars from the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to apply. AR’s beautiful campus nourishes the scholarly spirit, combining solitude and freedom from institutional responsibilities with a lively exchange of ideas. Resident scholars are provided with an office, low-cost housing, a stipend (amount varies according to award), library assistance, and other benefits. Fellowships involve a nine-month tenure, from September 1 through May 31.
Applications must include:

  • An abstract, not to exceed 150 words, describing the purpose and goals of the project.
  • A proposal, no more than four double-spaced pages in length, describing the research project, key questions to be addressed, methodologies, and significance. The proposal should also explain what is to be accomplished during the fellowship year and the status of the applicant’s research on the topic.
  • A short bibliography, not to exceed one single-spaced page, of references cited in the proposal.
  • A curriculum vitae, not to exceed four single-spaced pages.
  • Three letters of recommendation, not to exceed two pages in length each. Letters must be requested and submitted through the online application process and uploaded by the application deadline. Applicants are responsible for ensuring that references send their letters on time. Additional reference checks may be conducted for finalists.

    Opportunities marked with an (*) require completion of a clearance form with DePaul’s Development Office.

Spring 2020 Grants Newsletter: Arts and Humanities

National Endowment for the Humanities
Tier I: Planning, Basic Research, or Adaptation
Deadline: April 10, 2020
Website: https://www.neh.gov/sites/default/files/inline-files/Research%20and%20Development%202020%20notice%20of%20funding%20opportunity%2020200515-PR.pdf

The purpose of this program is to support projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of organizing, searching, discovering, and using such materials.Tier I grants provide support for up to two years, and $75,000, with projects strating March 1, 2021.  There is a pre-application webinar scheduled for April 1, 2020 1pm-2pm CT.

Research and Development Projects are encouraged in one or more of the following areas of special interest:

-Preserving our audiovisual and digital heritage. Research and Development
supports ongoing work to address the needs of collection formats most at risk of
obsolescence. Projects may consider addressing issues such as format degradation,
preservation work at scale, algorithmic and machine learning methodologies, storage, data appraisal, and curation.
-Conserving our material past. Research and Development supports the scientific
work to improve the conservation treatment and preventive care of cultural heritage.
-Protecting our cultural heritage. Research and Development supports the
development of tools, methods, technologies, or workflows for documenting, sharing, visualizing, and presenting lost or imperiled cultural heritage materials.
-Reaching under-represented communities. Research and Development supports
work in making preservation and access activities more accessible, sustainable, and
manageable for institutions with limited capacities and access to humanities collections, including persons with disabilities. NEH especially encourages projects that address and/or include as lead applicants and project partners institutions representing minority and indigenous communities.


Wenner-Gren Foundtion* 
Post-PhD Research Grants
Deadline: June 1, 2020
Website: http://www.wennergren.org/programs/post-phd-research-grants

The program contributes to the Foundation’s overall mission to support basic research in anthropology and to ensure that the discipline continues to be a source of vibrant and significant work that furthers our understanding of humanity’s cultural and biological origins, development, and variation. The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields.

The maximum amount of the Post-Ph.D. Research Grant is US $20,000.

Required application materials:

  • General information about yourself and your project
  • An abstract of your proposed research. If your application is successful, this abstract will appear on the Foundation’s website. Please make sure your abstract is written in a style that is clearly understandable to a non-specialist.
  • Answers to five project description questions. Carefully prepare your responses, which should directly address the issues these questions raise.  The best applications make full use of the space provided.
  • A resubmission statement if the current application is a resubmission of a previously declined application.
  • A detailed budget
  • A bibliography relevant to your proposed project
  • A curriculum vitae for the applicant

Association for the Sociology of Religion
Joseph H. Fichter Research Grant Competition
Deadline: May 1, 2020
Website: http://www.sociologyofreligion.com/lectures-papers/fichter-research-grant-competition/

Fichter Research Grants are awarded annually by ASR to members of the Association involved in promising sociological research on women in religion or on the intersection between religion and gender or religion and sexualities.  A total of $12,000 is available to be awarded annually, and this amount is usually distributed among several of the leading applications in the year’s competition. Applicants must be members of ASR.  Grant funds can be used to pay for direct research expenses, such as (1) transportation expenses to conduct research; (2) the cost of hiring a research assistant or transcriber; (3) computer software packages that are not typically provided by a college or university (e.g., specialized statistical software packages).

Application procedures:

-Craft proposal of no more than 5 double-spaced pages (1250 words) that outlines the rational and plan of research.  It should have a descriptive title for the research project (e.g., “A Examination of Women’s Leadership Role in Two Catholic Parishes”), present a clear research question, review previous research and theory that forms the background for the study, describe the social scientific research method(s) that will be used to carry out the research as well as a research timetable, and summarize succinctly what the research aims to discover.

-A detailed, one-page budget.  It should indicate the items for which the applicant is seeking funding, and next to each item, the amount it will cost (in U.S. dollars) and the exact purposes for which it will be used. An itemized budget is necessary to enable the Fichter Committee to determine if the budget is reasonable and for decisions concerning partial funding.  Applicants are advised to NOT include items in their proposed budget that ASR does not cover (see above). IMPORTANT NOTE: A single proposal should prepare a budget that includes no more than $5,000.

-An updated curriculum vitae, including a statement of his/her qualifications to carry out the proposed research, and a current email address at which he/she can be contacted during the summer months.


World Resource Institute-Ross Center
WRI Ross Center Prize for Cities
Deadline: May 7, 2020
Website: https://prizeforcities.org/#about
Prize: Cash prize of $250,000, four runners-up: $25,000, travel to NYC for awards ceremony.

Eligibility:

All types of organizations/entities and individuals from the public, private and not-for-profit sectors are eligible to participate. Submissions may be for initiatives and projects anywhere in the world commenced after January 1, 2000.

Please consult the Terms and Conditions before you apply.

An initiative or project is a specific activity or programmatically linked set of activities in the city. Programmatic linkages may be by design, for example being part of a common, documented strategy; by virtue of common financial support, common oversight, or shared implementation teams; or by documented commitment to shared goals. A Project could refer to a number of types of activities that fit into a range of categories, including social, technological, and/or institutional innovation, training or awareness raising activities, policy or regulatory reform, and infrastructure creation or modification.


American Journalism Historians Association
Joseph McKerns Research Grant
Deadline: June 1, 2020
Website: https://ajha.wildapricot.org/mckerns

Award is for $1,250 and can be used for travel or research related expenses, but not salary.

Eligibility:

All current AJHA (American Journalism Historians Association) full members with a minimum of three years’ membership at the time of application are eligible.

The research must be related to mass media history.
Awardees are expected to continue their membership through the grant period.
Members may apply for a McKerns Research Grant once every five years.

Application Procedures:

-Complete application form included with the Call For Proposals.
-1 to 3-page prospectus/overview of the project, including a budget (which should include a listing of amount and sources of other support, if appropriate), timelines, and expected outlets for the research.
-If appropriate, include Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from the applicant’s university.
-A shortened curriculum vita (no more than 3 pages).
-Submit documents by email as a pdf.


National Endowment for the Humanities
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants (DHAG)
Deadline: June 30, 2020 (optional draft due May 19, 2020).
Website: https://www.neh.gov/grants/odh/digital-humanities-advancement-grants

Three Levels of Award:
Level I: $50,000
Level II: $100,000
Level III: $325,000 in outright funds, $50,000 in matching funds.

Awards to go to organizations to produce articles, digital material and publication, workshop, report, teaching resources, digital infrastructure, software (3 year grant).  In support of its efforts to advance digital infrastructures and initiatives in libraries and archives, and subject to the availability of funds and IMLS discretion, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) anticipates providing funding through this program. These funds may support some DHAG projects that further the IMLS mission to advance, support, and empower America’s museums, libraries, and related organizations. IMLS funding will encourage innovative collaborations between library and archives professionals, humanities professionals, and relevant public communities that advance preservation of, access to, and public engagement with digital collections and services to empower community learning, foster civic cohesion, and strengthen knowledge networks. This could include collaborations with community-based archives, community-driven efforts, and institutions or initiatives representing the traditionally underserved. Interested applicants should also refer to the current IMLS Strategic Plan for additional context.

Website has examples of narratives and checklists for application materials.

Applications should be submitted through Grants.gov.


Women’s Studio Workshop
Studio Workspace Residency
Deadline: June 30, 2020
Website: https://wsworkshop.org/residencies/studio-residency-grant/

The Studio Grant is a six- to eight-week residency for artists to create new work in any of our studio disciplines: intaglio, letterpress, papermaking, screenprinting, photography, or ceramics. WSW invites applications from artists at any stage in their careers.

This grant includes a stipend of $350/week, up to $500 for materials used during the residency, up to $250 for travel within the Continental US, free onsite housing, and 24/7 studio access. WSW can also provide technical advice and production assistance.
Application Process:
This residency has a two-step jury process: a rotating, impartial jury selects the finalists and then WSW applies for NEA funding for the chosen projects.
-Notification date: October 30
-Residency length: 6-8 weeks
-Residency occurs: 1-2 years after application, September through June
Application must include:

-A current resume

-A brief description of your proposed project, including the studio(s) you’d like to use. 300 word maximum.

-Up to ten images of recent work (digital specifications here)

-An image script, which should include title, medium, dimension, and date of each image


Light Work
Artist-in-Residence Program
Deadline: July 1, 2020
Link: https://www.lightwork.org/air/apply/

Each year Light Work invites 12-15 artists to participate in its residency program, including one artist co-sponsored by Autograph ABP and one artist commission for Urban Video Project (UVP). Artists selected for the residency program are invited to live in Syracuse for one month. They receive a $5,000 stipend, an apartment to stay in, a private digital studio, a private darkroom, and 24-hour access to our facility.

Participants in the residency program are expected to use their month to pursue their own projects: photographing in the area, scanning or printing for a specific project or book, and so on. Artists are not obligated to lecture at our facility, though we hope that the artists are friendly and accessible to local artists and students. Work by each Artist-in-Residence becomes a part of the Light Work Collection and is published in a special edition of Contact Sheet: The Light Work Annual along with an essay commissioned by Light Work.

Eligibility:

Our international residency program is open to all artists working in photography or image-based media, from any country.

Application Procedures:

Applications must be submitted by the posted deadline. Applicants will receive an e-mail from SlideRoom confirming that we have received an application. While submissions are open throughout the year, our main selection committee review concludes in the late fall and notifications will be sent no later than December of each year. Please be patient in this process. We will contact you should we need more information, and to notify you of your application status when the time comes.


John Templeton Foundation*
Science and the Big Questions
Deadline: August 14, 2020
Link: https://www.templeton.org/funding-areas/science-big-questions

Funds work in the strategic areas of natural sciences, human sciences, philosophy & theology, and public engagement.  The work this foundation funds falls into one or more of the following themes:

-fundamental structures and laws of nature
-the nature of the divine
-the nature and potential of the human mind
-religion and spirituality in human experience
-life, love, and virtue

Grant duration is typically up to three years.

Interested applicants should submit project idea through online funding (OFI) inquiry portal and may be invited to submit full application.

-Small grants are requests for $234,800
OFI deadline: August 14, 2020

-Large grants are for more than $234,800
OFI deadline: August 14, 2020


Opportunities marked with an (*) require completion of a clearance form with DePaul’s Development Office.

Additional funding search tools are available on the ORS website at: https://offices.depaul.edu/ors/pre-award-services/identifying-funding/funding-search-tools/Pages/default.aspx

Spring 2020 Grants Newsletter: Social Sciences

American Sociological Association
Annual Meeting Travel Fund
Deadline: April 1, 2020
Link: https://www.asanet.org/careers/grants-and-fellowships/annual-meeting-travel-fund
Eligibility requirements:

 -ASA membership.  This requirement applies to applicants who reside in the United States. The membership requirement is waived for international applicants, who are defined as sociologists who (1) were born outside of the United States and (2) currently live and work (if employed) outside of the United States.

-Listed in the Annual Meeting program.  To receive an AMTF award, applicants must be listed in the Annual Meeting program.

-Not a student. Applicants cannot be current students in an undergraduate or graduate sociology program at the time of application.  Students are encouraged to apply for a Student Forum Travel Award.


American Sociological Association
Student Forum Travel Awards
Deadline: April 1, 2020

Link: https://www.asanet.org/careers/grants-and-fellowships/student-forum-travel-awards
Eligibility requirements: Applicants must be students pursuing an undergraduate or graduate sociology degree in an academic institution and a current student member of ASA at the time of application. Participation in the Annual Meeting program (e.g., paper sessions, roundtables), purpose for attending (e.g., workshop training, Honors Program participation), student financial need, availability of other forms of support, matching funds, and potential benefit to the student are among the factors taken into account in making awards. A travel award committee of the ASA Student Forum convened especially for this purpose will select awardees.


Association for the Sociology of Religion
Joseph H. Fichter Research Grant Competition
Deadline: May 1, 2020
Link: http://www.sociologyofreligion.com/lectures-papers/fichter-research-grant-competition/

Fichter Research Grants are awarded annually by ASR to members of the Association involved in promising sociological research on women in religion or on the intersection between religion and gender or religion and sexualities.  A total of $12,000 is available to be awarded annually, and this amount is usually distributed among several of the leading applications in the year’s competition. Applicants must be members of ASR.  Grant funds can be used to pay for direct research expenses, such as (1) transportation expenses to conduct research; (2) the cost of hiring a research assistant or transcriber; (3) computer software packages that are not typically provided by a college or university (e.g., specialized statistical software packages).

Application procedures:

-Craft proposal of no more than 5 double-spaced pages (1250 words) that outlines the rational and plan of research.  It should have a descriptive title for the research project (e.g., “A Examination of Women’s Leadership Role in Two Catholic Parishes”), present a clear research question, review previous research and theory that forms the background for the study, describe the social scientific research method(s) that will be used to carry out the research as well as a research timetable, and summarize succinctly what the research aims to discover.

-A detailed, one-page budget.  It should indicate the items for which the applicant is seeking funding, and next to each item, the amount it will cost (in U.S. dollars) and the exact purposes for which it will be used. An itemized budget is necessary to enable the Fichter Committee to determine if the budget is reasonable and for decisions concerning partial funding.  Applicants are advised to NOT include items in their proposed budget that ASR does not cover (see above). IMPORTANT NOTE: A single proposal should prepare a budget that includes no more than $5,000.

-An updated curriculum vitae, including a statement of his/her qualifications to carry out the proposed research, and a current email address at which he/she can be contacted during the summer months.


National Science Foundation
Social Psychology
Deadline: July 15, 2020
Website: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5712&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund

The Social Psychology Program at NSF supports research and research infrastructure to advance basic knowledge in social psychology. Projects funded by the Social Psychology Program support the NSF mission to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; and to secure the national defense. Proposals considered by the Social Psychology Program must communicate both the intellectual merit of the science and its broader societal impacts.

Proposed research should carry strong potential for creating transformative advances in the basic understanding of human social behavior.  Among the many research topics supported are: social cognition, attitudes, social and cultural influence, stereotypes, motivation, decision making, group dynamics, aggression, close relationships, social and affective neuroscience, social psychophysiology, emotions, prosocial behavior, health-related behavior, and personality and individual differences.  Proposals that develop new theories or methods for understanding social behavior are highly encouraged.  Research samples should represent substantial ranges of ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, cultures, and other dimensions of human populations.

Interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and convergent research approaches are encouraged.  Proposals involving non-human animals are considered only if the research offers clear and direct contributions to understanding human social behavior. The program does not fund research that seeks to improve clinical practice as its primary outcome, nor does it consider proposals with disease-related goals, including work on the etiology, diagnosis or treatment of physical or mental disease, abnormality, or malfunction in human beings or animals.

In assessing intellectual merit, the Social Psychology Program places highest priority on research that is theoretically grounded, based on empirical observation and validation, and with designs appropriate to the questions asked.  In assessing broader impacts, the Social Psychology Program places highest priority on proposals that offer strong potential to benefit society, strengthen our national security interests, improve the quality of life, broaden participation in science, enhance infrastructure for research and education, and include a plan for sharing the results with a wide variety of audiences.

The Social Psychology Program accepts regular research proposals, including Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) proposals, proposals for research in undergraduate institutions (RUI), rapid response research proposals (RAPID), and early-concept grants for exploratory research (EAGER).  The Program also accepts small conference proposals for events (including workshops) being planned one year or more after submission.  The Social Psychology Program does not accept proposals for doctoral dissertation improvement awards.


Sociological Initiatives Foundation
Grant
Deadline: August 14, 2020
Website: http://www.sifoundation.org/

The Sociological Initiatives Foundation is dedicated to the belief that research and action are intrinsically inseparable.  We invite concept proposals for projects that link an explicit research design to a concrete social action strategy.  Projects should also have clear social change goals.

SIF has funded projects in the areas of civic participation, community organizing, crime and law, education, health, housing, immigration, labor organizing, and language/literacy.

Some examples of desired applicants are:

  • community-led academic partnerships
  • advocacy or community groups that conduct research that can withstand challenge in academic and policy arenas
  • grassroots organizations that organize or link to a constituency through their research
  • A limited number of concept applicants will be invited to submit full proposals in the fall of 2020.

Projects typically take two years, so applicants should think in terms of such a timeline.

The Sociological Initiatives Foundation supports social change by linking research to social action.  It funds research projects that investigate laws, policies, institutions, regulations, and normative practices that may limit equality in the United States and Puerto Rico.  It gives priority to projects that seek to address racism, xenophobia, classism, gender bias, exploitation, or the violation of human rights and freedoms.  It also supports research that furthers language learning and behavior and its intersection with social and policy questions.

The Foundation supports research that focuses on improving services and systems and increasing positive social and physical conditions through:

Policy development
Placement and shaping of the policy agenda
Policy adoption or implementation
Policy blocking
Increasing advocacy capacity and political influence
Shaping public sentiment
Addressing challenges related to language and literacy
Language issues include literacy, language loss and maintenance, language policy, language and national security, bilingualism, language and gender, language and law, language disabilities, language and health, language and education, different language cultures, and second language acquisition.

In the context of social and racial inequality dating back centuries, the Foundation supports projects that address institutional rather than individual or behavioral change.  It seeks to fund research and initiatives that provide insight into sociological and linguistic issues that can help specific groups and or communities expand opportunities and challenge injustices.

Grant sizes normally range from $10,000 to $20,000. We look for projects that have an explicit research design and a concrete connection to public or community impact. It is not enough to just write a report or add a focus group to a social change project. The research should build an organization or constituency’s potential to expand public knowledge, impact policy, and create social change.

Short concept proposals are due on August 16th each year.   A limited number of concept applicants are then invited to submit full proposals in November.  Our analysis of past grant recipients has shown that projects typically take two years, so applicants should think in terms of such a timeline.

Some examples of desired applicants are:

  • academic-community partnerships
  • advocacy or community groups that conduct research that can withstand challenge in academic and policy arenas
  • academics that organize or link to a constituency through their research

Types of Support and Limitations

  • Preference is given to providing support in areas that tend to be under-funded and for projects of a size where a Sociological Initiatives Foundation grant can make a difference.
  • For nonprofits, grants are restricted to organizations that are tax-exempt under Section 501(c) 3 of the Internal Revenue Code and classified as “not a private foundation” under section 509(a).
  • The Sociological Initiatives Foundation does not make grants directly to individuals for any purposes.
  • SIF also welcomes applications from academic institutions and other qualified organizations wishing to sponsor research projects by individual scholars or practitioners.
  • No awards are made for dissertation research, honoraria or political purposes.
  • The Foundation does not provide operating support or capital grants.
  • Grant sizes normally range from $15,000 to $20,000.
  • The geographic focus is limited to the United States and its territories.

 

 


National Science Foundation
Division of Social and Economic Sciences
Sociology
Deadline: August 17, 2020
Link: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5369

The Sociology Program supports basic research on all forms of human social organization — societies, institutions, groups and demography — and processes of individual and institutional change. The Program encourages theoretically focused empirical investigations aimed at improving the explanation of fundamental social processes. Included is research on organizations and organizational behavior, population dynamics, social movements, social groups, labor force participation, stratification and mobility, family, social networks, socialization, gender, race and the sociology of science and technology. The Program supports both original data collections and secondary data analysis that use the full range of quantitative and qualitative methodological tools. Theoretically grounded projects that offer methodological innovations and improvements for data collection and analysis are also welcomed.

In assessing the intrinsic merit of proposed research, four components are key to securing support from the Sociology Program: (1) the issues investigated must be theoretically grounded; (2) the research should be based on empirical observation or be subject to empirical validation or illustration; (3) the research design must be appropriate to the questions asked; and (4) the proposed research must advance our understanding of social processes, structures and methods.

Crosscutting Research & Training Opportunities:

  • ADVANCE: Increasing the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers
  • Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program
  • Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
  • Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program
  • SBE Postdoctoral Research Fellowships (SPRF)
  • Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)
  • Research at Undergraduate Institutions (RUI)
  • Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

Russell Sage Foundation
Small Grants
Deadline: None
Link: https://www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply/small-grants-apply/guidelines
Eligibility
Non-tenured junior faculty members who are no more than two years beyond the receipt of their Ph.D. (or equivalent graduate degree). There are no limitations on the disciplinary background of the researcher. The Foundation encourages applications from scholars who are traditionally underrepresented in the scientific disciplines and RSF’s application pool.

Proposal
Proposals should be submitted through RSF’s online application portal. The maximum length of a proposal is four single-spaced pages, excluding budget and bibliography (with standard 11 or 12-point font, and 1-inch margins). Proposals should outline the rationale of the research, clearly state the question(s) under study and the methods and analytic approach to be employed. The proposal should briefly discuss the project’s relevance to the foundation’s programs and how it would contribute to RSF’s mission to improve social and living conditions in the U.S.

Budget
Representative categories of expenditure that should be described in the budget narrative include:
Data acquisition, such as data access fees or the purchase of data sets;
Laboratory costs;
Research assistance;
Subject payments;
Travel (for data collection or access only)
Other research expenses will be considered on a case by case basis.

No funds may be used to support (1) salary or conference travel for the investigator or co-authors, or (2) the purchase of computer hardware or software. RSF does not allow indirect costs on small grants and restricts the project period to one year. A budget that appears to be excessive will be grounds for rejecting a proposal. For detailed information about what can and cannot be included in the budgets, as well as the budget template, see the RSF Budget Guidelines at: http://www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply/apply-project-awards/budget.

Application procedures:
-Applications must be submitted via the RSF online application portal, Fluxx.
-Create an account or log in to your existing account. **Allow up to 48 hours for a new account to be approved**
-Start a new “Small Grants” application and select the appropriate program (BE or CSS) option.
-Submit the following documents:

A concise single-spaced proposal (4 pages maximum) describing the proposed work;

A detailed Excel budget using the Foundation’s budget template;

A budget narrative;

An up-to-date abbreviated CV (maximum of 5 pages per CV);

An organization confirmation letter – a letter from your home institution stating that it will manage the funds for the project should a grant be made;

Applications are generally reviewed within 6-8 weeks. Grants will be approved or rejected with no possibility of subsequent negotiation.

Winter 2020 Grants Newsletter: Humanities

Sustainable Arts Foundation*
$5,000 award each to twenty artists with children. Award is unrestricted cash, applicants use funds as they see fit. 
Deadline: February 28, 2020
Link: https://apply.sustainableartsfoundation.org/

Eligibility:
To be eligible, the applicant must have at least one child under the age of 18.

Artists and writers with at least one child and a strong portfolio of polished work are welcome to apply.

We are inspired by anyone who is making creative work while raising a family. Given the intense demand for these awards (we typically receive over 3,000 applications), and the fact that the awards are based on demonstrated excellence in your discipline, we don’t recommend that artists or writers who are beginning their creative careers apply to this program.

While we don’t require that applicants have published or exhibited their work, the rigor and critique involved in that process can certainly benefit the portfolio. Portfolios of writing or artwork created in a more personal vein for sharing with friends and family are not suitable.

Half of awards go to applicants of color.

Application Process:

Juried award.

$20 application fee, submit portfolio of work created since becoming a parent and in the last three years.


Creative Capital Award

Creative Capital provides each funded project with up to $50,000 in direct funding and career development services valued at more than $50,000, for a total commitment of over $100,000 per project. Themes for work include: history, civic practice, immigration, education systems, and the built environment. 
Deadline: February 29, 2020
Link: https://creative-capital.org/award/about-the-creative-capital-award-open/

Eligibility:

  • At least 25 years old
  • A working artist with at least five years of professional experience
  • A U.S. Citizen, permanent legal resident, or an O-1 Visa holder

Application process:

February 1 through February 29 at 4pm ET: Open Application

Project proposals will be accepted in a free and open application through the month of February. Along with project title, descriptions, and selection of up to two disciplines, applications include questions about the goals of the project, work samples, and provide a total budget number for the project.

July: Second Round Review

Projects selected to advance to the second round will be notified at this time. Project proposals will be reviewed by a new pool of evaluators in this phase. No additional material will need to be submitted.

October: Panel Review

Projects chosen to advance to panel review will be asked for a project update and will be reviewed for a final panel of evaluators. No additional material will need to be submitted.

November: Decision

Panel meetings will be held in New York City in the fall. Projects will be chosen for support and submitted to the board of directors for final approval. Selected artists will be notified of the decision before the end of the year, and will be invited to attend an orientation in the spring, and the Creative Capital Artist Retreat in the summer.

December: Announcement

A public announcement of the Creative Capital Awards will be made in the winter.


Houston Center for Contemporary Craft

Artist Residency Program

Deadline: March 1, 2020

Link: https://www.crafthouston.org/artists/residents/apply-to-program/

Media accepted: Wood, Glass, Metal, Fiber, Clay, and Mixed Media

Applicants must be able to fulfill a program requirement of working in their studios for two days per week during HCCC public hours. All resident artists are required to open their studios to public interaction on Saturdays and one other day of the week (TBD), as well as during exhibition openings and specific educational programs on the evenings and weekends. Applicants should consider the public-facing nature of the residencies and the fact that a major goal of the program is to provide visitors with an opportunity to explore contemporary craft through engaging with working artists.

5-10 residencies awarded, each includes a $600 monthly stipend.

Application Process:

Applicants for HCCC’s Artist Residency and for the ICP Residency will apply through the same online application.  All applicants must provide the following information when completing the online application:

Artist Statement: In one page or less, describe your creative work, process, technique, and conceptual development. Tie your statement to a specific process or work that is depicted in your images.

Resume: Three pages or less.

Three References: Provide contact information for three references. References will be contacted in the final stages of the interview process.

Images of 10 Works Created within the Last Two Years: Upload one wide shot and one detail for each of 10 pieces, for a total number of 20 images.

International Applicants: International applicants must provide proof of eligibility to work in the U.S.— green card or appropriate visa—with application.


American Council of Learned Societies

Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Competition for Recent PhDs

Deadline: March 18, 2020

Link: https://www.acls.org/Competitions-and-Deadlines/Mellon-ACLS-Public-Fellows-Program/Mellon-ACLS-Public-Fellows-Competition-for-Recent-PhDs

Stipend: $70,000 per year, employer-based health insurance, a relocation allowance, and up to $3,000 in professional development funds over the course of the fellowship

Tenure: Two years; start date on August 3 or September 1, 2020, depending on the fellowship position

21 Two-year terms positions offered at organizations in government and non-profit sectors for recent PhDs in the humanities and humanistic social sciences.

Eligibility:

Applicants must have a PhD in the humanities or humanistic social sciences (see note on eligible fields below) conferred between September 1, 2016 and June 19, 2020.

Applicants defend and file/deposit their completed dissertations no later than April 6, 2020, and be prepared to verify this with official university documentation during the review and selection process.

Applicants must be authorized to work legally in the United States. Neither ACLS nor the host organization will sponsor fellows for work visas.

Application Process:

Fellowships serve in specific roles at specific organizations.

Applicants can apply to up to two positions.

Application materials:

-A completed application form

-A cover letter tailored to each selected position and addressed to the host organization (1-2 pages). Applicants applying for two positions will submit two distinct cover letters.

-A résumé (1-2 pages). Applicants applying for two positions will submit two résumés.

-Two reference letters for each selected position.


Archaeological Institute of America
AIA Society Outreach Grant Program
Deadline: April 6, 2020
Link: https://www.archaeological.org/grant/society-outreach/

This grant is meant for innovative outreach programs, replicable by other societies and beyond the regular lecture program supported by the national office (see past projects). Funds may be used for any expense related to organizing and conducting the programs, these include but are not limited to materials, travel expenses, honoraria, advertisements, and publicity. If funds are requested for a lecture, the Society should provide adequate explanation as to how this lecture is meaningfully different from the routine lecture series (e.g., involvement of new audience, development of new partnerships, educational programs, visibility in an attractive segment of the community or the like). Grant money cannot be used for things like outside management (i.e. hiring an event planner) or for basic operating costs. The grant is available to any chartered AIA society. Preference is given to new projects. Currently requests for $500 are being considered.

Eligibility: AIA Membership.
Application Process: complete form online, include justification for use of funds.


National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships
Deadline: April 8, 2020
Link: https://www.neh.gov/grants/research/fellowships
Maximum award is $60,000 ($5,000 per month) open to individuals to produce book, digital material, publications, translations, other scholarly resource.

Fellowships provide recipients time to conduct research or to produce books, monographs, peer-reviewed articles, e-books, digital materials, translations with annotations or a critical apparatus, or critical editions resulting from previous research.  Projects may be at any stage of development.

Website includes past examples of narrative materials. NEH Fellowships are competitive awards granted to individual scholars pursuing projects that embody exceptional research, rigorous analysis, and clear writing.  Applications must clearly articulate a project’s value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both.

Eligibility:

The Fellowships program accepts applications from individuals who meet the following requirements. Citizenship U.S. citizens, whether they reside inside or outside the United States, are eligible to apply.

Foreign nationals who have been living in the United States or its jurisdictions for at least the three years prior to the application deadline are also eligible. Foreign nationals who take up permanent residence outside the United States any time between the application deadline and the end of the period of performance will forfeit their eligibility to hold an award. (Leaving the U.S. on a temporary basis is permitted.) While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree granting program are ineligible to apply. Applicants who have satisfied all the requirements for a degree and are awaiting its conferral are eligible for NEH Fellowships; but such applicants must include a letter from the dean of the conferring school or their department chair attesting to the applicant’s status as of the application deadline in Attachment 6: Degree Conferral.


National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan
Deadline: April 22, 2020

Link: https://www.neh.gov/grants/research/fellowships-advanced-social-science-research-japan

The Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan program is a joint activity of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission (JUSFC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The program aims to promote Japan studies in the United States, to encourage U.S.-Japanese scholarly exchange, and to support the next generation of Japan scholars in the U.S. Awards support research on modern Japanese society and political economy, Japan’s international relations, and U.S.-Japan relations. The program encourages innovative research that puts these subjects in wider regional and global contexts and is comparative and contemporary in nature. Research should contribute to scholarly knowledge or to the general public’s understanding of issues of concern to Japan and the United States. Appropriate disciplines for the research include anthropology, economics, geography, history, international relations, linguistics, political science, psychology, and sociology. Awards usually result in articles, monographs, books, e-books, digital materials, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources.

The fellowships are designed for researchers with advanced Japanese language skills whose research will require use of data, sources, and documents, onsite interviews, or other direct contact in Japanese. Fellows may undertake their projects in Japan, the United States, or both, and may include work in other countries for comparative purposes. Projects may be at any stage of development.

Maximum amount is $5,000 per month for 6-12 months.

Note: applicants can apply to ONLY ONE of the following research programs per year (NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publications, Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan, Awards for Faculty at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Awards for Faculty at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Awards for Faculty at Tribal Colleges and Universities.

Application Procedures:

Complete on Grants.gov.

Opportunities marked with an (*) require completion of a clearance form with DePaul’s Development Office.

Additional funding search tools are available on the ORS website at: https://offices.depaul.edu/ors/pre-award-services/identifying-funding/funding-search-tools/Pages/default.aspx

OpenRefine- A Useful Tool for working with Messy Data

At the end of the summer, I attended a training at the library conducted by DePaul’s Data Services Librarian Kindra Morelock.  The training was on OpenRefine and was weird for me because she was teaching an incredibly basic but necessary data skill using a very powerful tool.  She showed us how to use OpenRefine (OR) for cleaning messy data.

Messy data, the kind generated in public documents, are the worst kind.  Till now, there hasn’t been a great way to deal with it.  Usually it meant sorting through row upon row of data, manually changing values until they sort of match up in a way that doesn’t make you want to vomit.  For example, if you have lots of people entering data on NFL sports teams, it is likely that New England Patriots gets entered as: “Pats”, “Patriots”, “NE Pats”, “New England Patriots”, “NEpatriots”, etc.  If you want to do any type of meaningful analysis, you have to first start with cleaning up this dataset and getting all of those entries into a uniform value.

This is a totally fine process if your datasets aren’t terribly large.  But if you’re dealing with a couple of thousand observations, it can get tedious quick.  That is where OpenRefine comes in.

Originally developed by Google, OpenRefine is a tool to manipulate and work with data.  While you do so through a Chrome browser window, the data actually live on your machine.

I am working with some data that DePaul’s SSRC collected with a needs assessment survey, where faculty were asked about their current research projects and needs.  One of the questions asked respondents to report their departmental affiliation in an open text response.  Because it was open ended and people refer to their departments in different ways, it was necessary to clean this item up and standardize how departments are named in the dataset.  See how these responses varied? In OpenRefine, the window on the left shows the various responses.  The blue arrows show some categories and names that need to be renamed.

openrefine

This window shows how different faculty members refer to their departments.  Some use abbreviations, some don’t.  Some typed “and” and others used the “&”.

In that window on the left, I can modify the data on the fly.  This is particularly useful if you only have a handful of variations.  As you modify the data, changing “ENGLISH” to “English”, you can see the number next to the entry change (which reflects the changes and the updates you’ve made to the group.  So in this example, when I change ENGLISH to English, the number beside English will increase to 11 and ENGLISH will disappear.

Screenshot 2017-10-27 15.09.15

Even more powerful is the Cluster and Edit feature, which will show you a listing of all all the categories that OR thinks should go together.  See below- how Sociology, SOCIOLOGY, and sociology all look like they are part of the same category.  In cluster and refine, you can not only cluster all of these together, but also change their cell value.  If you were so inclined, you could change the label to “Soc. Dept” where it says “Sociology” under New Cell Value.

Screenshot 2017-10-27 15.09.40

OR includes some other editing/cleaning features.  Additional and unnecessary spaces can cause problems when doing data analysis.  Some programs ignore them, some programs can’t and others input an underscore for that space.  In OR, you can trim leading and trailing spaces.  Or change cases from title case to lower case or upper case.

Screenshot 2017-10-31 09.51.09In other cases, you can work with the values of a column and systematically deal with quirks in how people do data entry.  Take for example the following values:

Rizzo, Anthony

Kris Bryant

Contreras, Wilson E.

When you think about how names get entered into a dataset, the three examples above are the three most likely you’ll see.  Of course, the distribution of these is likely influenced by a lot of extraneous factors, including organizational characteristics.  But let’s assume that you have reasonably intelligent people participating in data entry and somehow end up with this mess above.  Even for a relatively small dataset of a couple thousand observations, it would take someone a couple of days to standardize all the names.  The best approach would be to create three additional columns (for first name, last name, and middle initial) and then to go row by row and manually input that data.

If you use OR though, you can write JSON language script that will do this automatically.  Long story short, you basically tell OR:

  1.  Every time there is a comma, to treat everything that comes before it as last name and to put that value into a new cell in column LAST NAME.
  2. Every time there is a period, to treat everything that comes immediately before it as a middle initial and put that value into new cell in column MIDDLE INITIAL.
  3. In the absence of a comma and or a period, the text that comes before a space is a first name, put that information into a new cell in the column FIRST NAME.

Screenshot 2017-10-31 10.06.58Because you’re using scripting language (JSON) it is fairly painless to take a couple of passes through a dataset, building out columns and populating cell values in a matter of minutes.  Moreover, when you’re using OR, your actions are kept as a running record or script, that you can copy and paste and keep for next time.  This means that if you’re working on a project that requires frequent data updates and downloading a new dataset from the same resource, you can use the script OR generates and get results with updated data, without having to go through the *painful* process of manually data cleaning.  Essentially, once you’ve done it once, you can reuse that script to clean your dataset.

In the workshop, Kindra shared with the group a cheat sheet of sorts to havk JSON programming language in OR.  I have scanned it and included it here: OpenRefine_cheatsheet_KindraMorelock.  In all, this was an incredibly useful workshop.  While I don’t often have to work with super messy data, I have decided that Open Refine is my new go-to when I do.

Some resources for learning how to work with Open Refine:

  1. http://openrefine.org/
  2. Using OpenRefine (e-book)
  3.  Introduction to OpenRefine on YouTube Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

Research at the Year End, 2017

On June 1, the SSRC held its first Research Round Up, to commemorate the end of the academic year.  DePaul faculty members who have worked with SSRC staff or resources over the course of the year were invited to present on their work.

The event was held in Arts and Letters and was well-attended by members of the DePaul community.  After SSRC Director Greg Scott introduced each of the presenters, CDM Faculty member Robin Burke gave an update of the Reading Chicago Reading project- an interdisciplinary venture he has been working on during the last year with DePaul English faculty member John Shanahan.   Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Burke and Shanahan started with a well-defined question and problem: Is it possible to predict popularity of One Book, One Chicago selections using library and demographic data?  As the project has advanced, their connections and relationships to other scholars in the DePaul community have allowed them to broaden their interests and start pushing the boundaries of what is possible.  Currently, they are working on text analysis of One Book books, but also text analysis of reviews of those books.

Shailja Sharma from International Studies talked about her experience breathing life into a new research area and project.  She talked about the lengths that she went to, cobbling together small grants, and relying on Skype interviews to move her recent book project, Postcolonial Minorities in Britain and France: In the Hyphen of the Nation-State forward, little by little.

Next, Writing, Reading and Discourse faculty member Sarah Read discussed strategies for keeping two separate research agendas going.  In her presentation, she showed a table that included a work plan and how she moved each project along, little by little.  For Sarah, wanting to maintain two separate research agendas meant that she had work on them simultaneously- not one at a time.  In her talk, she discussed the importance of making sure that all of her scholarly activity fit squarely within those agendas.   She also discussed the importance of having a group at DePaul that kept her accountable and productive.  She said that this kept her research on her desk every week, so that when there were breaks in teaching, she was able to spend less time reorienting herself with her research and materials, and more time writing.

Finally, Political Science Assistant Professor Ben Epstein reported on his experiences turning his PhD into a book proposal and how he survived the revision and re-submission process before signing the book contract.  One of the biggest issues he grappled with during the revision process was staying true to the spirit of the original work, and not letting suggestions from others change the book.  For him, revising came down to three things: 1.  Make it better, not different.  2.  Agree with a suggestion or defend why you can’t.  3.  Don’t underestimate the energy and time it takes to write the response to the editors and reviewers.  He stressed the importance of finding tools that work.  For some people, they work better in an analogue environment, writing their to-do list down others do better with an app that helps them manage their process.  He also strongly recommends the book, On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser.

The event closed with a Q&A with the presenters.  In all, it was a great event, with many agreeing that there should be another event in 2018.