Resources for Learning Stata

I started thinking about it the other day and realized that I have been using Stata for over ten years.  OVER TEN YEARS!!  Seriously, where has the time even gone?

I realized that we might be due for a nifty resource list for learning Stata.  There is a lot out there, and it can be difficult to wade through what is there when you have different types of questions and problems.  Sometimes I just need a quick reminder on the exact formatting of the code/syntax for a particular command.  Sometimes I am trying to help novice users get their feet wet.  The former needs a solution at the 3 foot level, the latter needs a 30,000 foot view.

Below, I have categorized some of the Stata Resources that I use often.  As I find more and more items, I will come back and add to this list.

Beginning/Broad Knowledge:

A Gentle Introduction to Stata– Last published this year, this text is in the 5th edition and is good for learning the specifics of data management, exploratory statistics, and analyses. Princeton Website– A step by step tutorial for working in Stata.  Also covers a lot more of the “why”.

UNC Pop Center Website-Has commands sorted by function for ease.  If you are looking for help on combining data files, you’d find five examples commands you could use.

IDRE UCLA Website– This is a wonderful resource for interpreting Stata output.

YouTube Channels:

edX Channel on Getting Started with Stat

David Braudt Introductory Stata workshop

Specific Knowledge:

Stata PDF Manuals- these are pdf files that are accessible from the Help menu of Stata.  The manuals are organized according to type of analysis, like there is a document for Time Series Analysis and one for Structural Equation Modeling.

The Workflow of Data Analysis Using Stata– Despite the fact that this edition was published in 2008, there is a lot of extremely valuable information here on how to organize Stata data and do files, as well as version control.

YouTube Channels:

StataCorp Channel

 

 

 

 

 

SSRC at the CCHE Health Disparities and Social Justice Conference 2016

Last week DePaul’s MPH Program and the Center for Community Health Equity co-hosted the Health Disparities and Social Justice Conference at the Loop Campus in conjunction with DePaul’s MPH program.  The day was full of fantastic events regarding health disparities and social justice issues in Chicago and beyond.  The opening keynote was delivered by Patricia O’Campo of the Centre for Urban Health Solutions at St. Michael’s Hospital in Ontario, Toronto.

Friends of the center Noam Ostrander and Fernando de Maio participated in a panel discussion of the Chicago Health Equity Reader, a year long project whose ultimate aim is to produce a reader of the essential readings on Chicago Health.

safeshape

SSRC Director and Sociology Faculty member Greg Scott was on hand with the Safe Shape exhibit as well as two collaborative film projects (Everywhere but Safe and Making a Place Called Safe) he has produced with  VOCAL-NY and the San Francisco Drug Users Union.  Noam Ostrander presented his collaborative project with SSRC Senior Research Methodologist Jessica Bishop-Royse on seasonal patterns in homicide mortality in the US.

The event brought together a wide variety of public health professionals, students, researchers, public officials, and community stakeholders, who were afforded the opportunity to engage with presenters and provide feedback and comments.

Map Customizer

This summer I discovered a sweet mapping tool.  For a lot of researchers and writers, it can be tricky to get places plotted on a map.  Don’t get me wrong, I adore Google Maps, but it gets fairly tedious manually adding cities to the map.  Screenshot 2016-08-04 12.00.34

Map Customizer allows you to enter a list of locations manually (by typing) or copying and pasting a list from a text editor or spreadsheet.  It uses Google Maps for mapping.

Screenshot 2016-08-04 12.01.54

Once you’ve created your survey, you can save it and point back to your map’s address.

Screenshot 2016-08-04 12.16.39

I think it is super helpful if you have a lot of addresses, cities, or locations to enter and would really just like to do so with a copy and pasted list.

Health Disparities and Social Justice Conference 2016

The joint collaboration between DePaul University and Rush University, the Center for Community Health Equity, is hosting the Health Disparities and Social Justice Conference on Friday August 12, 2016.  The conference will take place in the DePaul Center, at the 8th Floor of 1 East Jackson Blvd from 830am-4pm.  Registration is free and the program is posted online HERE.

safeshape

DePaul SSRC Director Greg Scott will have his project Safe Shape on exhibition.  Senior Research Methodologist Jessica Bishop-Royse will be presenting collaborative work on seasonal patterns in homicide mortality in the US with DePaul MSW faculty member Noam Ostrander.

 

 

Google’s NGram viewer

This is probably old hat to everyone- but I recently discovered Google’s NGram Viewer, which can compile a line graph of specific words published in books on a timeline.

You could graph specific words against each other, like comparing medicine, public health, and demography against each other.  Even cooler is that you can specify specific datapoints, say 1800-2016.  Or, 1800-1900.

demography ph and medicine

It is a pretty elegant feature, it can show how our understand of subject areas have changed over time.

men womenhttps://books.google.com/ngrams/info

It’s simplicity could be useful for people wanting to generate simple and elegant figures for presentations and classes, etc.

Field Learning

Newly graduated Master of Public Health (MPH) students Adenike Sosina and Joselyn Williams recently talked about the extra-curricular skills they acquired as research assistants at the Center for Community Health Equity (CCHE). Their analysis of one project will be displayed at the 9th annual Health Disparities & Social Justice Conference that CCHE and MPH will host at the DePaul Center on August 12.

In a conference poster, they will summarize the focus group discussions that CCHE helped Rush conduct in conjunction with Rush Medical Center’s comprehensive Community Health Needs Assessment. The focus groups were made up of residents and stakeholders from the 8 Chicago West Side community areas (West Town, Austin, East Garfield Park, West Garfield Park, Near West Side, North Lawndale, South Lawndale, and Lower West Side) and 3 near west suburbs (Forest Park, Oak Park, and River Forest) that Rush serves. They were formed to discover what Adenike described as “the impact of the communities’ perceptions, their needs, things they believed to be beneficial.” That should help Rush understand what makes a good community and what relationships community members value, Joselyn added.

The two researchers began working at CCHE and with CCHE Co-Director and Associate Professor of Sociology Fernando De Maio in 2015—Adenike as CCHE Program Assistant and Joselyn as CCHE Graduate Assistant. Founded jointly in 2015 and based at DePaul, CCHE is a partnership between DPU and Rush designed to link social scientists, students, community groups, and health care professionals in a search for data-based solutions to community health problems.

Last fall and winter Adenike and Joselyn collaborated with CCHE on the assessment report Rush prepares every three years to evaluate the overall state of health in its service areas and to develop internal implementation strategies and community collaAdenikeborations. Using NVivo software, they later analyzed 11 “massive” focus group transcripts—also prepared by a number of DePaul and Rush students—to identify recurring themes such as resources, education, socialization, social division, health care, safety, responsibility, and ownership, Adenike said.

“The software itself served as a resource,” said Joselyn, a self-describJoselyned ‘data nerd’. “[It’s] kind of intuitive. There’s not a lot of bulky things you have to have previous help with.” The researchers also utilized SSRC technical and consulting resources, for transcribing the focus group discussions and for training in GIS and mapping fundamentals. The poster will illustrate the findings of their analysis.

“There was an array of other concerns, besides health, in which they wanted their voices to be heard,” said Adenike. She was impressed by the range of what focus group participants wanted to convey. Across communities, focus groups cited the lack of resources, including insufficient recreational outlets for youth, job opportunities, access to retail and good food, and inadequacies in the city’s educational system.

“…It’s like we’re almost a forgotten community…,” a member of the North Lawndale focus group complained. “And if we could just get a lot of these young guys some work and young women and young men to work, it will be a big change in the community,” a West Garfield Park participant offered.

In conversations about what they liked about their communities, participants voiced “probably a lot more positive thoughts around social cohesion,” Joselyn observed. “Most identified with their community,” she said. “I didn’t feel like anyone said ‘this is per se a bad community.’ They recognized the good and the bad. They wanted the community to be better.” Discussions about how Rush might partner with the community produced suggestions for collaborating with schools, operating mobile clinics to provide services such as back-to-school vaccinations, or pairing medical school students with community teens around health issues and mentoring, Adenike noted.

Both MPH graduates agreed that their work at CCHE leaves them feeling better prepared as they start their own careers. Joselyn, who made some GIS maps for the assessment to show where Rush ranked in child opportunity and hardship indices, appreciated the opportunity to work alongside hospital administrators and to observe how a big organization undertakes a report of this scope. She was struck by the length of the assessment process.

This fall Joselyn will begin teaching English to elementary students in the Gyeongbuk province in South Korea. From there she hopes to explore opportunities for a career abroad in global health. Adenike wants to work in community health practice after her position at CCHE ends in late summer. She’s especially interested in childhood obesity interventions.

At CCHE, graduate and undergraduate student researchers will continue to gain project-based experience working on analyses of the new Healthy Chicago Survey, the creation of an “Index of Concentration at the Extremes” for Chicago census tracts, and comparative analyses of health inequities in Chicago and other cities. DePaul faculty and students will continue collaborating with the Chicago Department of Public Health and other groups across the city as they build on CCHE’s contribution to “Healthy Chicago 2.0”, the city’s four-year initiative to assess and improve health and well-being and reduce inequities among Chicago communities.

Visit CCHE’s website to see the Rush Community Health Needs Assessment report and to learn more about the upcoming Health Disparities & Social Justice Conference at DePaul. Faculty or students doing research on faculty projects who want to access NVivo are invited to contact the SSRC where the program is available in our Lincoln Park computer lab or through remote connection.

How many more men than women suffered vehicular fatalities in the U.S in 2012?

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System, more males died in vehicular accidents than females in every single state in 2012 (the latest year data is available). The graph below shows the rate of deaths of occupants involved in motor vehicle crashes by gender per 100,000 population in alphabetical order by state.

North Dakota ranked highest in male deaths at 29.3 and Missouri had the most female fatalities in the country, 14.2. In Illinois, the male death rate of 6.3 was nearly double that of females, 3.2.

Top 5 states for male vehicular death rates
State                       Death Rate (per 100K)
North Dakota                    29.3
Mississippi                        22.3
Wyoming                           21.9
Montana                             21.9
Oklahoma                          19.2

Top 5 states for female vehicular death rates
State                       Death Rate (per 100K)
Wyoming                           12.9
Montana                            10.9
North Dakota                    10.5
Arkansas                           10.4
Kentucky                           10.1

 

Click through to see the enlarged image.

DeathRate

Ask us how to visualize your research
For help visualizing your own research findings or seeing if your research lends itself to similar techniques including data acquisition and pre-processing of both quantitative and qualitative data, contact Nandhini Gulasingam at mgulasin@depaul.edu.